10 multifamily building water conservation tips for early spring

10 multifamily building water conservation tips for early spring

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Now that spring has sprung, it’s time to inspect any damage caused during the winter.

As conditions warm – thawing the ground and warming the air – here’s a list of conservation tips from water conservation firm WaterSignal to help those who own and manage multifamily structures identify leaks and conserve water by staying proactive throughout the spring and summer.

1.) Check the water pressure on each building. Excessive pressure (more than 80 psi) can increase the chance of leaks.

2.) Reduce lawn irrigation. Most communities overuse water, but it’s easy to train your grass to grow with less.

3.) Make sure all irrigation rain sensors are working.

4.) Monitor the water line to the swimming pool as it is notorious for leaks. Not only will it save on water, it will save on chemicals, too.

5.) Inspect all units for leaks quarterly while performing preventative maintenance. Be sure to also check laundry rooms for leaks, as well as hose bibs for drips.

6.) Inspect basement crawl spaces for leaks. Even small leaks here can cause devastating structural damage.

7.) Check your property for wet spots and alligatored pavement. These are common signs of an underground leak.

8.) Take a daily walk through vacant units to check for running faucets or toilets.

9.) Reduce lawn areas or replace grass turf with new, deep-rooted varieties that require less water.

10.) Buy products bearing the EPA’s WaterSense label for conservation and performance.


Topics: Automation and Controls, Building Owners and Managers, Consulting - Green & Sustainable Strategies and Solutions, Interiors, Multifamily / Multiunit Residential, Plumbing, Protective Systems - Alarms / Sprinklers / Other, Water Saving Strategies and Devices, Weatherization


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